Fluoride and increased risk of ADHD

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Another study finds that fluoridated tap water is linked to a higher risk of ADHD and symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention among children and especially adolescents.
“These findings, which point to a potential cumulative effect of fluoride exposure, highlight the need for further investigation of the potential for fluoride-mediated developmental neurotoxicity in populations with water fluoridation."
Julia Riddell
Faculty of Health, York University, Ontario, Canada

This study1, conducted in Canada, found that higher tap water fluoride levels and fluoridation of municipal water supplies were associated with a higher risk of an ADHD diagnosis as well as increased symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention among children and teenagers but especially among adolescents.

The data came from a government sponsored nationwide survey of health and nutrition (Canadian Health Measures Survey) involving Canadian youth aged 6 to 17 years. The study found that children living in areas with fluoridated water had a 284% higher risk of having a diagnosis of ADHD as those who lived in non-fluoridated areas.  This study confirmed two previous studies linking fluoride to ADHD from Mexico and the USA [Malin 2015 and Bashash 2018].

“These findings, which point to a potential cumulative effect of fluoride exposure, highlight the need for further investigation of the potential for fluoride-mediated developmental neurotoxicity in populations with water fluoridation,” said the study’s lead researcher.

 

  1. Association of water fluoride and urinary fluoride concentrations with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in Canadian youth
    Julia K.Riddell (a); Ashley J.Malin (b); David Flora (a); Hugh McCague (c); ChristineTill (a)

(a) Faculty of Health, York University, Ontario, Canada;
(b) Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, United States;
(c) Institute for Social Research, York University, Ontario, Canada

Environment International; Volume 133, Part B, December 2019, 105190